Discussion:
Sane User Guide
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rowanknox
2017-04-03 11:07:22 UTC
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I'm not really sure if I'm in the right place for this message, but I'm
sure I'll be put right if not.

After some months of attempts I have finally got the Samsung SCX-4100 to
scan to Ubuntu 14.04.
I am now in a position to start using Sane but find the dialogue complex
and confusing so I have been looking for a basic Step-by-step User Guide
or Manual, but with little success.

Is there such a thing & if so where would I find it please?

For instance where is the 'Save To' dialogue? & I've currently got an
aborted scan with a message "Error during read:device busy" despite
having closed it down & rebooted. etc etc

Nic
Roger
2017-04-05 01:51:01 UTC
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Post by rowanknox
I'm not really sure if I'm in the right place for this message, but I'm
sure I'll be put right if not.
After some months of attempts I have finally got the Samsung SCX-4100 to
scan to Ubuntu 14.04.
I am now in a position to start using Sane but find the dialogue complex
and confusing so I have been looking for a basic Step-by-step User Guide
or Manual, but with little success.
Is there such a thing & if so where would I find it please?
For instance where is the 'Save To' dialogue? & I've currently got an
aborted scan with a message "Error during read:device busy" despite having
closed it down & rebooted. etc etc
Nic
If I'm not mistaken, best results are obtained when scanning the image as it
is; completely avoiding any contrast, color saturation and/or sharpening
augmentation by the scanning program. Use Gimp or other dedicted tool for
these contrast/color/sharpening, as these tools accel at doing so.

If I use XSane, I keep all image (color) adjustments set to default or zero (as
I do with VueScan), and at most only using the ICC/ICM scanner profile during
scanning. Of course also specifying media type; reflective, positive, or
negative.

The main rational for instituting the contrast/color/sharpening tools within
scanner programs, are for those whom just needing something to work now and
magickly, versus having any concern about quality. Even selecting the scan
region could be called extra work, as cropping within Gimp is likely far
better. The only reason I select the scan region, is to omit non-essential
image parts for reducing the resulting file size. Additional cropping for
image clean-up is reserved for Gimp here. And stick to PNM/TIFF image file
format.

The Book of Gimp (2013) goes into some good detail on using XSane, and explains
what all those funny tick boxes do, for which I was oblivious for more than a
decade until just recently reading the book. The book goes into some basic
work-flow, and somewhat describes the above. (The book also explains how to
minimize color changes within XSane's interface.) Many whom use VueScan for
photography, strictly adhere to the previously mentioned workflow, while also
scanning explicitly to either VueScan's RAW or to TIFF image formats.

A good place to buy this book, or computer books in general, is oreilly.com.
The Book of Gimp is probably the best read I've seen on Gimp (or anything
related to computer graphics) as of yet.
--
Roger
http://rogerx.freeshell.org/
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