Discussion:
gamma table value
(too old to reply)
F J Brooks
2003-05-14 19:58:16 UTC
Permalink
Thanks, Henning.

Gosh! I feel like a naughty schoolboy summoned to the headmaster's study!
However, if it helps you to help me for this 75-year-old to play the
recalcitrant scholar, then so be it!

I must ask you to forgive me if I point out that taking me to task for
getting where I am, and grilling me as to WHY I'm here, is all very well,
but the plain fact is that I am where I am - and I'm asking for help in
arriving at a solution. Before I start, it might be useful if I explain my
position: I am a simple, humble computer USER. I am not a geek or a techie,
and I have no wish to become a programmer. I use my
PC as a TOOL - not as an occupation, a way of life, or a source of
entertainment. I have been a W*****s user for something over five years and
am fed-up with its unreliability, vagaries and unpredictability - hence my
interest in Linux.
I must say that my experiences over the past two months or so have not
filled me with confidence, as I've found that SuSE Linux (I don't know
about other distributions) is about as USER-unfriendly as one
could get. After installing, I spent three weeks trying (in the end
successfully) to get onto the net and send email. After that debilitating
experience, I remarked to someone that I felt like I'd bought a new BMW and
then had to strip down the engine and remove and replace a piston before I
could drive it for the first time. Now, after about two weeks of struggling
to get my scanner to work, to carry this analogy further, I feel
like I've also had to replace the back-axle (because it was the wrong type),
dismantle the gearbox and re-grind two of the gear-wheels to get them to
mesh properly, and replace the chip in the engine management system!
It's not necessary to delete glib and gtk. In fact, if you do that,
you'll remove all gtk applications from your system and that's
probably not what you want. Removing sane-backends (and maybe xsane as
a dependency) is enough.
Where did you get the impression that glib/gtk must be removed? That
documentation should be fixed.
When I started this scanner venture - which was something I had never
tackled before and had no knowledge of whatsoever - I gathered together as
much information as I could find on the subject. That included:

'Scanning with Linux' by Richard Drummond (Linux Format, December 2002).
'Scanning with SANE and Other Tools' by Michael J Hammel (Linux Journal,
April 2003).
'YoLinux Tutorial: Scanners and Linux' by Greg Ippolito
(http://yolinux.com).
'SANE: Linux scanner how-to. For beginners' by Steve Sheriff, 21 April 2001
(http://www.xs4all.nl/~ljm/SANE/howto.html)

I later acquired various other documentation (I now have a room-full of
paper!), including 'The SANE Avision backend' by Rene Rebe, 27 March 2003
(http://drocklinux.dyndns.org/rene/avision), and a pile of SANE FAQs,
READMEs, INSTALL guides, etc, etc.

The problem with most of this material (like, in my experience, MOST
computer articles, guides, HOWTOs and so-called 'Help' files), is that they
are written by geeks for geeks, and assume that you know how to do things
before you start. This leaves a humble, novice, never-been-there-before
USER, not only cold, but out in the cold. Quite often, I'm not able to get
beyond the first paragraph before my eyes glaze over and I throw the
offending paper down in disgust with an expletive or two, exclaiming (as our
American friends say: 'Excuse me!? Come again!?').

In going through the documents I started with, I reluctantly came to the
conclusion that the only one which was suitable for my level of
understanding was the Sheriff (even tho it was somewhat dated), because he
obviously understood my predicament precisely, and wrote accordingly - with
every command clearly set out. The rest were, to a varying degree, uneven
and inconsistent - sometimes spelling out commands, sometimes not, sometimes
leaving me completely in the air with statements like, '...unpacking the
tarball and performing the usual configure/make incantation.' (Drummond).
[Excuse me!? Come again!?], and: 'For most scanners you can make educated
guesses from the SANE web site supported-hardware list.' (Hammel). [Excuse
me!? Come again!? - I'm not educated!]; or telling me what I need to do but
not HOW TO DO IT, with vague, super-assumptive statements like: 'Once
configured (should be quite easy - or happen automatically on modern Linux
distributions' (Rebe) [Excuse me!? Come again!?]
I hesitate to ask this eminence: 'Have you ever tried to get an HP Scanjet
5300C working on SuSE 8.1?']

So I went with Sheriff. He starts by telling me to remove glib, gtk+, sane
and xsane - 'in order to install new and up-to-the-minute libraries to make
SURE that all compiles.' This I do, using YaST2. Then he gets me to copy
($cp -a /usr/src/linux/include/scsi /usr/include). This is not a good start
for me as I get the response: 'No such file or directory.' However, I press
on and, as instructed, create a new directory (/home/<username>/scanner),
into which I download and install glib-2.2.1.tar.gz, gtk+-2.2.1.tar.gz,
sane-backends-1.0.11, and xsane-0.90, as described in my original message.

Next day, I added sane-frontend-1.0.11.
I guess it would have been even easier to just use a SuSE binary RPM,
e.g. this inofficial one from
http://packman.links2linux.de/index.php4?action=211 (not tested by me).
Excuse me, Henning!? Come again!? I'm sorry, but you've lost me already:
I've no idea what a 'SuSE binary RPM' is!
I then opened new directory /home/<username>/scanner, went to
ftp.mostang.com and downloaded > >into it sane-backends-1.0.11, xsane-0.90,
glib-2.2.1 and gtk+-2.2.1 (all .tar.gz). I then, in turn,
unzipped them and gave them the './configure, make, and make install'
treatment
(all in he /home/<username>/scanner directory). In the process I had to
overcome some problems with > >'Error: make:*** No targets specified...'
etc, and 'Error: make install:*** No rule to make target...'
That usually means that you are not in the directory of the package,
forgot to run configure or configure hasn't finished because of errors.
If this happened in sane-backends, sane-frontends, or xsane, please
tell us the exact error message and what you did before.
No, I didn't 'forget to run configure'! Unfortunately, I didn't keep my log
of my sane-backends 'transactions' (unlike me!). However, I can say, with
some certainty, that there could not have been
anything wrong, otherwise I would have remembered and done something about
it. I do recall that it told me that if I had any problems to read
'PROBLEMS' - which I did - and there was nothing alarming there. The
situation with glib-2.2.1 and gtk+-2.2.1 was different, and I had error
messages on both at the end of the 'configure' routine. On glib, it said:
'checking for pkg-config...no onfigure: error:*** pkg-config not found. See
http://www.freedesktop.org/software/pkgconfig

On gtk+, there was a similar error message re pkg-config [sic].

So I went to that site, downloaded and installed pkgconfig-0.15.0. Then
configured gtk+ again and got:
'Perhaps you should add the directory containing glib-2.0.pc'. So I
configured, 'make' and 'make install' both glib and gtk+ again, and both
looked OK.

Then I downloaded and configured xsane-0.90. At the end of configure, it
said:
**************************************************************************
'ERROR: GTK-1.2.0 or newer is needed for compiling xsane
if you installed gtk as rpm make sure you also included gtk-devel'
**************************************************************************

It added: 'you may need to remove /dev/null before you can run configure
again.'

As (a) I didn't understand this, and (b) it said 'may', I ignored this (my
subsequent configure of xsane showed this to be the correct decision).
etc, and to download and install 'pkgconfig-0.15.0', and install
'gtk-devel' (latter using YaST2)
pkgconfig isn't needed by any SANE package as far as I know. If you
compile gtk from source code, you don't need to install "gtk-devel",
because the headers are included in the source package. In fact, when
you installed gtk-devel you also installed gtk (if you had removed it
at all). So compiling gtk didn't make much sense ...
That's why I installed pkgconfigure and glib-devel - because I was TOLD to!
I've downloaded/read reams and reams of paper with titles like
'INSTALL',
For installing sane-backends, INSTALL should be enough.
You say that, but you weren't there to tell me that the information on the
sane-backends, which told me to read README, INSTALL and PROBLEMS, was
WRONG!. I also read the 'Beginners Information' and all the other
documentation I listed in my original message.
The documentation is in the man pages. If something is missing, it
should be added. Please tell us what didn't work and what's missing.
I do not know how to answer this. You must understand that, as a very naive,
non-expert, I can only rely on the information I am given, and do what I am
told to do. I do not recall being told to read 'man pages' - but I WAS told
to read README, INSTALL and PROBLEMS.
The problem is: You just can't make a "good, simple, clear
documentation that supposes no previous knowledge". That would be a
big book if it should tell details for every supported scanner.
Then that's a major shortcoming of Linux!
A short, simple instruction is: Install sane-backends, run scanimage
-L. If it doesn't work, read man sane, man sane-backendname.
But I did install sane-backends and ran scanimage -L and
sane-find-scanner - with the results detailed below - which, you say: 'Looks
fine', So I had no reason to think that there is anything wrong with
sane-backends - if there is(?).
But that means that you must know what a shell is, how to start
programs from the shell, how to read man pages. So it doesn't work
without previous knowledge.
I do not understand this point at all.
'found SCSI scanner "HP Scanjet 5300C 6.00" at /dev/scanner
found SCSI scanner "HP Scanjet 5300C 6.00" at /dev/sg2'
Looks fine.
'device 'avision:/dev/scanner' is a Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 5300C
flatbed scanner
device 'avision:/dev/sg2' is a Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 5300C flatbed
scanner'
Looks fine, also.
Did you try to actually scan with scanimage? What happened?
No, not being 'command-line-literate', being naturally lazy, and having been
brought up (if that's the right expression) on W*****s, I prefer to click an
icon.
This all looked promising (altho I'm a bit worried as to why there
should be two items in each case, and wonder if I should delete one!),
If you do a "ls -l /dev/scanner" you'll see that /dev/scanner is just
a link to /dev/sg2. You can remove that link but that's not necessary.
but, when I try
'KDElnit could not launch "xscanimage": Could not find "xscanimage"
executable'.
Neither sane-frontends nor sane-backends contains a "desktop Scanner
icon".
On my SuSE desktop - both 'root' and 'user' versions, which are slightly
different - there are a number of icons, such as Trash, /Windows/C,
/Windows/D,
OpenOffice, CD-R, CD-ROM, etc, etc, including one marked: 'Scanner'.
This is the icon I clicked.
When you removed sane-backends from your distribution, you most probably
also removed xscanimage (or it was never installed).
The reason I downloaded/installed sane-frontend was that I understood that
it included xscanimage which, presumably, was removed when I removed
sane-frontend.
So, yesterday, I downloaded and installed 'sane-frontend-1.0.11'
(./configure, make, and make install).
Ok. I like xsane more, but your mileage may vary.
As I stated in my original message, I have also downloaded/installed xsane
as it seems to be generally recommended., but haven't yet tried to use it
(none of the articles I have cited tells me how!)
Then, when I clicked the 'Scanner' icon on the desktop, I got a small
'avision/scanner' and 'avision/sg2'. I tried them both in turn, with the
On 'Acquire Preview', the scanner grunts and whirrs a bit, then I just
get a black bar across the top of the 'Preview' window. When I click
'Scan',
'Error: Failed to set value at option gamma-table'.
Maybe the maintainer of the avision backend can answer this part.
The error message looks a bit strange, was this really the exact
wording? Anyway, it probably means that the frontend (xscanimage)
tried to set an option of the backend (avision) and failed. Maybe a
backend problem but I don't remember anyone mentioning it until now.
Sorry, Henning, the error message I quoted was not quite complete. It
actually included two more words (no doubt, absolutely vital!) and said:
'Error: Failed to set value at option gamma-table. Device busy.'
I know that he has updated the backend to not use that SCSI-over_USB
kernel driver bu that's not in 1.0.11 (but 1.0.12-pre1). I don't know
however, if that has anything to do with your problem.
I do not understand this at all, and cannot find any trace of it in all
the
literature I've listed above - or any solution on Google.
I guess it's a problem with the backend or the kernel driver. It's not
easy to examine what's going on with so little information. So first
scanimage --version
Response: 'scanimage (sane-backends) 1.0.11; backend version 1.0.11'
scanimage >image.pnm
Response: scanner whirred for a short time. Otherwise, no response on
screen.
SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=255 scanimage >image.pnm
Response: None at all.
You'll forgive my cynicism if, after all these 'adventures', I give a
hollow
laugh when I note that 'SANE' is an acronym for 'Scanner Access Made
Easy' [!!!]
It's easy. Well, most of the time :-) I just did "apt-get install
xsane", plugged in my Mustek ScanExpress 1200 CU, started XSane.
Voila, scanning works, took 40 seconds. So basically it works. Your
a) Not using precompiled packages. Well, I know, SuSE doesn't provide
updated packages between releases. But that's really not our fault.
b) Misleading documentation (glib/gtk). I hope that's not our docu.
Otherwise we can fix the docu, but we need specific hints on what's
wrong or missing.
c) Maybe problems with the backend (or kernel module)?
Thanks, so far, Henning. Any further helpful input would be appreciated.

Has anyone else (including the 'maintainer of the avision backend' [as
Henning put it]) any idea about the error message: 'Error: Failed to set
value at option gamma-table. Device busy.'

Thanks.

Best

Fred
Major A
2003-05-14 21:11:16 UTC
Permalink
Fred,

I think I've understood some of the problems you're having with
GNU/Linux and SANE, so let me comment on your email.
Post by F J Brooks
The problem with most of this material (like, in my experience, MOST
computer articles, guides, HOWTOs and so-called 'Help' files), is that they
are written by geeks for geeks, and assume that you know how to do things
before you start. This leaves a humble, novice, never-been-there-before
There is a hierarchy of documentation for GNU/Linux software
available, ranging from introductory books meant for the novice to
make them acquinted with the ideas behind UNIX and Linux, through user
and administrator manuals down to programming manuals and
specifications for those who know everything else and want to write
some useful code that interfaces with what others have done.

Trying to use GNU/Linux for the first time and trying to read anything
else than the introductory books is like trying to drive a coach the
first time you see one. It's a much better idea to travel in one first
as a passenger to get an idea of how a coach works.
Post by F J Brooks
USER, not only cold, but out in the cold. Quite often, I'm not able to get
beyond the first paragraph before my eyes glaze over and I throw the
offending paper down in disgust with an expletive or two, exclaiming (as our
American friends say: 'Excuse me!? Come again!?').
You quite clearly tried to read the wrong document then.
Post by F J Brooks
In going through the documents I started with, I reluctantly came to the
conclusion that the only one which was suitable for my level of
understanding was the Sheriff (even tho it was somewhat dated), because he
This is the one BIG problem with all computer-related
documentation. Whereas you can read about driving a coach from books
that are 20 years old, a document that is a few months old might very
well be outdated in the computer world. You must make sure you always
have up-to-date material, and as soon as you come across something you
cannot find anywhere on the internet, you must get suspicious that
what you're reading might not be the latest.
Post by F J Brooks
obviously understood my predicament precisely, and wrote accordingly - with
every command clearly set out. The rest were, to a varying degree, uneven
Please understand that this doesn't work, it's never going to. The
entire idea behind today's software is that everyone has total freedom
to install software on their computers as they wish. Therefore, typing
in commands from a book verbatim will sooner or later give you an
error message because something isn't installed or is in a different
place from what the book expects.

Back to my analogy: doing this is precisely like driving a bus using a
special atlas that tells you when (not where!) to push the brake or
turn the steering wheel by x degrees.

The only way around this is to learn the basics so you can either read
the more advanced and more specific literature or be confident enough
to work out from those 1:1 commands in Sheriff (whatever that might
be) what you have to do.
Post by F J Brooks
So I went with Sheriff. He starts by telling me to remove glib, gtk+, sane
and xsane - 'in order to install new and up-to-the-minute libraries to make
SURE that all compiles.' This I do, using YaST2. Then he gets me to copy
($cp -a /usr/src/linux/include/scsi /usr/include). This is not a good start
See? You haven't got the kernel source installed, probably because
you've never built a kernel. Did Sheriff tell you to? If so, why isn't
there a distribution with all the Sheriff instructions already carried
out? (Besides, copying those files is the wrong thing to do anyway.)
Post by F J Brooks
for me as I get the response: 'No such file or directory.' However, I press
on and, as instructed, create a new directory (/home/<username>/scanner),
into which I download and install glib-2.2.1.tar.gz, gtk+-2.2.1.tar.gz,
sane-backends-1.0.11, and xsane-0.90, as described in my original message.
So, according to Sheriff, you tried to build all these from source
code. This used to be necessary in the old days (up until about 5
years ago), but these days, most distributions will give you very good
facilities for installing pre-built packages. That way, you can build
sane-backends and xsane from source without rebuilding almost
everything else that is required by these two.
Post by F J Brooks
I guess it would have been even easier to just use a SuSE binary RPM,
e.g. this inofficial one from
http://packman.links2linux.de/index.php4?action=211 (not tested by me).
I've no idea what a 'SuSE binary RPM' is!
You're trying to make a scanner work with GNU/Linux, and as such, you
are a system administrator. Therefore you must know -- at least --
what distribution you use (SuSE in your case), and from there can work
out from information on the internet how the distribution installs and
manages packages on your computer. (Besides, I'm sure every
introductory book mentiones RPMs these days.)
Post by F J Brooks
It added: 'you may need to remove /dev/null before you can run configure
again.'
(Aehhh, anyone know where this could come from? It's not supposed to
refer to /dev/null, is it?)
Post by F J Brooks
The problem is: You just can't make a "good, simple, clear
documentation that supposes no previous knowledge". That would be a
big book if it should tell details for every supported scanner.
Then that's a major shortcoming of Linux!
No, it's not: as I said above, it's all there, it's just split up in a
hierarchy. Windows, MacOSX, etc. are all the same -- you start with
those "Windows for dummies" books and finally end up at something more
advanced that certainly requires some background knowledge to
read. (Except that with Windows, many of the more advanced documents
such as programming specifications are simply missing.)
Post by F J Brooks
A short, simple instruction is: Install sane-backends, run scanimage
-L. If it doesn't work, read man sane, man sane-backendname.
But I did install sane-backends and ran scanimage -L and
sane-find-scanner - with the results detailed below - which, you say: 'Looks
fine', So I had no reason to think that there is anything wrong with
sane-backends - if there is(?).
Why did you remove it then? Both sane-frontends and xsane build on it,
sane-backends is totally independent of these frontends.
Post by F J Brooks
but, when I try
'KDElnit could not launch "xscanimage": Could not find "xscanimage"
executable'.
Neither sane-frontends nor sane-backends contains a "desktop Scanner
icon".
On my SuSE desktop - both 'root' and 'user' versions, which are slightly
different - there are a number of icons, such as Trash, /Windows/C,
/Windows/D,
OpenOffice, CD-R, CD-ROM, etc, etc, including one marked: 'Scanner'.
This is the icon I clicked.
This is nothing to do with SANE. You may think otherwise, but the
command line is a very basic instrument, not only in GNU/Linux but
also in Windows (in fact, more than before with its modern
super-intelligent versions).

I can only guess (don't really know SuSE nor KDE or whatever desktop
you use) that the "scanner" button simply tries to run xscanimage,
which is equivalent to you typing "xscanimage" on the command line.
Post by F J Brooks
As I stated in my original message, I have also downloaded/installed xsane
as it seems to be generally recommended., but haven't yet tried to use it
(none of the articles I have cited tells me how!)
Well, if you could build scanimage and run it, then you'll certainly
be able to do this one as well -- the basic procedure is exactly the
same.

Hope I didn't upset anyone, didn't mean to.

Andras

===========================================================================
Major Andras
e-mail: ***@users.sourceforge.net
www: http://andras.webhop.org/
===========================================================================
Henning Meier-Geinitz
2003-05-14 22:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Post by Major A
Post by F J Brooks
It added: 'you may need to remove /dev/null before you can run configure
again.'
(Aehhh, anyone know where this could come from? It's not supposed to
refer to /dev/null, is it?)
I think that's because the newer autoconf stuff doesn't use
config.cache by default. At least with sane-backends you don't need to
remove config.cache. So the value for the name of the cache file may
be set to "/dev/null" by default now. Just a guess...

Bye,
Henning
F J Brooks
2003-05-15 07:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Major A
Fred,
I think I've understood some of the problems you're having with
GNU/Linux and SANE, so let me comment on your email.
Thank you very much, Andras, for your contribution.

I have carefully noted what you have to say.

I hope that you will not think me discourteous or ungrateful if I observe
that, unfortunately, it doesn't help me solve my current 'gamma-table' error
message problem.

I've given up on the desktop 'Scanner' icon - as no-one seems able to
provide a solution to the 'gamma-table' problem - and am pursuing XSane.
I'll see how I get on with that.

An idle thought: "As I'm an unashamed, lazy 'icon-clicker' - rather than a
'command-line-freak' [!!!], when I do get XSane working (which I am
confident I shall), it would be nice if I could 'convert' the 'Scanner' icon
on my desktop to an 'XSane' icon - then I can call up XSane more easily -
rather than having to go thru the tedious business of raising a shell, then
typing a command".

I know that this is absolute heresy to the Linux community, and I shall be
abused - if not 'drummed-out [!!!]

Is this possible? Any ideas?

Thanks again, anyway.

Best

Fred
Rene Rebe
2003-05-15 09:18:51 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

When you have read all this documents, why havent't you contacted the
Avision backend author (me) or choosed a subject for your mail which
I cany easily pick up ("gamma table values" -> "avision backend does
not work properly"). I do not have the time to read any mail on the
internet and also not to read all from this list ...

On: Thu, 15 May 2003 08:23:38 +0100,
Post by F J Brooks
I've given up on the desktop 'Scanner' icon - as no-one seems able to
provide a solution to the 'gamma-table' problem - and am pursuing XSane.
I'll see how I get on with that.
XSane will not be different when the low-level communication is not
working reliable.

Can you run these commands (in the same terminal on your desktop) and
mail me the output? Please power-cycle the scanner so that it is in a
clean state!

export SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=7
scanimage -L
scanimage -l 5mm -t 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm > scanner-name.png

Those commands are also listed on my SANE/Avision homepage ...
Post by F J Brooks
An idle thought: "As I'm an unashamed, lazy 'icon-clicker' - rather than a
'command-line-freak' [!!!], when I do get XSane working (which I am
confident I shall), it would be nice if I could 'convert' the 'Scanner' icon
on my desktop to an 'XSane' icon - then I can call up XSane more easily -
rather than having to go thru the tedious business of raising a shell, then
typing a command".
As written above when the driver does not work reliably a different
GUI application will not make any difference ... And I hope all your
re-/installation you wrote in the other mails did not made too much
harm to your system ...
Post by F J Brooks
I know that this is absolute heresy to the Linux community, and I shall be
abused - if not 'drummed-out [!!!]
Is this possible? Any ideas?
Replacing the icon? Sure it is possible. Simply right-click and select
properties and change the command to xsane ... (if I guess correct -
do not have SuSE anywhere ...)
Post by F J Brooks
Thanks again, anyway.
Best
Fred
Sincerely,
René Rebe
- ROCK Linux stable release maintainer

--
René Rebe - Europe/Germany/Berlin
***@rocklinux.org ***@gmx.net
http://www.rocklinux.org http://www.rocklinux.org/people/rene
http://gsmp.tfh-berlin.de/gsmp http://gsmp.tfh-berlin.de/rene
F J Brooks
2003-05-16 16:55:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rene Rebe
When you have read all this documents, why havent't you contacted the
Avision backend author (me) or choosed a subject for your mail which
I can easily pick up ("gamma table values" -> "avision backend does
not work properly"). I do not have the time to read any mail on the
internet and also not to read all from this list ...
Dear Rene

I'm very, very sorry that I have obviously upset you by not contacting you
direct with my problem. First, being a new newbie, I didn't like to bother
you. Second, I saw somewhere that you were threatening dire consequences for
anyone who sent you unsolicited emails. Perhaps I have totally misunderstood
the situation. As I say, I'm very sorry.

On your point re the subject of my email: I originally called it
'gamma-table value' because that was the subject of the error message and I
thought that it might ring a bell with someone. In any event, I had no idea
that it was anything to do with the Avision backend (has it??) as the error
message appeared when I clicked the 'Scan' button on my scanning window. In
my ignorance, I assumed that, as it came at that time, it must be something
to do with the 'xscanimage' function (?). Someone else added the 'Avision
backend' bit. Again, my apologies if, unintentionally, I have misled you.
Post by Rene Rebe
Can you run these commands (in the same terminal on your desktop) and
mail me the output? Please power-cycle the scanner so that it is in a
clean state!
export SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=7
scanimage -L
scanimage -l 5mm -t 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm > scanner-name.png
Right, so I ran these commands - both as root and as user - as I didn't know
which you wanted. These are extracts from my log:

'Thursday 15 May.logged in as root:
Response to commands:

F jBrooks:/home/fredjb # export SAN_DEBUG_AVISION=7
F jBrooks:/home/fredjb # scanimage -L

'No scanners were identified. If you were expecting something different,
check that the scanner is plugged in, turned on and detected by the
sane-find-scanner tool (if appropriate). Please read the documentation which
came with this software (README, FAQ, manpages).'

FJBrooks:/home/fredjb # scanimage -l 5mm -t 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm >
scanner-name.png

Response:

'scanimage: No SANE devices found'

Then logged in as user:

***@F jBrooks: > export SAN~DEBUG-AVISION=7
***@F jBrooks: > scanimage -L

I was presented with what appeared to be hundreds of lines of info which I
cannot possibly send you (unless you wish) as it is much too big a file. I
have extracted what, to my untutored eye, seemed to be the most interesting
bits.
It started with this:

'[sanei-debug] Setting debug level of avision to 7.
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line ""
[avision] sane-init: config file line 1: ignoring empty line
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "#option disable-gamma-table"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 2: ignoring comment line'

Then, a bit later, this:

'[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi FCPA"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 10: trying to attach 'scsi FCPA.
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi MINOL TA"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 11: trying to attach 'scsi MINOL TA.
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi MITSBISH MCA-S600C"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 12: trying to attach 'scsi MITSBISH
MCA-S600C'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi MITSBISH MCA-SS600"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 13: trying to attach 'scsi MITSBISH
MCA-SS600.
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi HP"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 14: trying to attach 'scsi Hp.
[avision] attach: (Version: 1.0 Build: 55)
[avision] attach: opening {dev{sg2
[avision] attach: sending INQUIRY
[avision] attach: Inquiry gives mfg=HP, model=Scanjet 5300C, product
revision=6.00.
[avision] FOUND'

Part-way thru, I got:

'[avision] attach: [8-15] Vendor id.: "HP"
[avision] attach: [16-31] Product id.: "Scanjet 5300C "
[avision] attach: [32-35] Product rev.: "6.00"
[avision] attach: [36] Bitfield: ADF 3-pass color RGB-COLOR-PLANE
[avision] attach: [37] Optical res.: 600 dpi
[avision] attach: [38] Maximum res.: 1200 dpi
[avision] attach: [39] Bitfield1: Q_SCAN EXTENDET_RES NEW_PROTOCOL
[avision] attach: [40-41] X res. in gray: 1200 dpi
[avision] attach: [42-43] Y res. in gray: 1200 dpi
[avision] attach: [44-45] X res. in color: 2400 dpi
[avision] attach: [46-47] Y res. in color: 2400 dpi
[avision] attach: [48-49] USB max read: 0'

Towards the end, I got:

'[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi hp"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 15: trying to attach 'scsi hp'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line ""
[avision] sane-init: config file line 16: ignoring empty line
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "/dev/scanner"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 17: trying to attach '/dev/scanner'
[avision] attach: (Version: 1.0 Build: 55)
[avision] attach: opening /dev/scanner
[avision] attach: sending INQUIRY
[avision] attach: Inquiry gives mfg=HP, model=Scanjet 5300C, product
revision=6.00.
[avision] FOUND'

Then, at the end:

'[avision] sane-init: parsing config line ""
[avision] sane-init: config file line 18: ignoring empty line
[avision] sane-get_devices:
device 'avision:/dev/scanner' is a Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 5300C flatbed
scanner
device 'avision:/dev/sg2' is a Hewlett-Packard Scanjet 5300C flatbed scanner
[avision] sane-exit:
***@F jBrooks:...>'

***@FJBrooks:~> scanimage -l 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm > scanner-name.png

It started off like this:

'[sanei-debug] Setting debug level of avision to 7.
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line ''''
[avision] sane-init: config file line 1: ignoring empty line
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "#option disable-gamma-table"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 2: ignoring comment line
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "#option disable-calibration"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 3: ignoring comment line
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "#option oId-calibration"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 4: ignoring comment line'

Then, a bit later:

'[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi AVISION"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 9: trying to attach 'scsi AVISION'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi FCPA"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 10: trying to attach 'scsi FCPA'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi MINOLT A"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 11: trying to attach 'scsi MINOLTA'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line 'Iscsi MITSBISH MCA-S600C"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 12: trying to attach 'scsi MITSBISH
MCA-S600C'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line 'Iscsi MITSBISH MCA-SS600'1
[avision] sane~nit: config file line 13: trying to attach 'scsi MITSBISH
MCA-SS600'
[avision] sane-init: parsing config line "scsi HP"
[avision] sane-init: config file line 14: trying to attach 'scsi HP'
[avision] attach: (Version: 1.0 Build: 55)
[avision] attach: opening /dev/sg2
[avision] attach: sending INQUIRY
[avision] attach: Inquiry gives mfg=HP, model=ScanJet 5300C, product
revision=6.00.
[avision] FOUND
[avision] attach: raw data:
[avision] [0] 00000110b 6o 6d 6x
[avision] [1] 10000000b 200o 128d 80x
[avision] [2] 00000010b 2o 2d 2x'

...and finished up like this:

'[avision] sane_cancel
[avision] sane_close'

I trust that these extracts are of some use to you.
Post by Rene Rebe
Replacing the icon? Sure it is possible. Simply right-click and select
properties and change the command to xsane ... (if I guess correct -
do not have SuSE anywhere ...)
I followed your advice and amended the command to be
$/usr/local/bin/xsane (which was the response to my $whereis xsane enquiry).

Then I (left)-clicked my 'Scanner' icon and: EUREKA!! up came the XSane
introductory window, which - after the licence agreement - invited me to
choose between: 'Hewlett-Packard ScanJet 5300C flatbed scanner
[avision:/dev/scanner]' and 'Hewlett-Packard ScanJet 5300C flatbed scanner
[avision:/dev/sg2]. I chose the former and, after some fiddling, managed to
get an image in the Viewer window. I couldn't, however, get it to print, but
as I haven't yet had time to set it up, I suppose that's not surprising.

However, this seems to me to be real progress - so you must excuse me if I'm
just a little 'cock-a-hoop'!

I'll be interested in what you have to say, Rene.

In the meantime, best wishes to you - and my apologies again for my faux
pas.

Fred
Henning Meier-Geinitz
2003-05-16 17:47:27 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Post by F J Brooks
Post by Rene Rebe
export SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=7
scanimage -L
scanimage -l 5mm -t 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm > scanner-name.png
Right, so I ran these commands - both as root and as user - as I didn't know
F jBrooks:/home/fredjb # export SAN_DEBUG_AVISION=7
No, SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=7, mind the "E" as in "easy" :-)
Post by F J Brooks
F jBrooks:/home/fredjb # scanimage -L
'No scanners were identified. If you were expecting something different,
[...]

Because of the missing E nothing was printed. Rene wanted the debug
information that's printed when you set the environment varaible
SANE_DEBUG_AVISION to a value of 7.
Still not the right one, but it seems to work nevertheless :-)
Post by F J Brooks
I was presented with what appeared to be hundreds of lines of info which I
cannot possibly send you (unless you wish) as it is much too big a file. I
If you didn't know already: Use "scanimage -L 2>log" to send the debug
output into a file (in this case it's named "log" and is found in the
current directory). Use "less log" to display it. This way it may be
easier to insert the ouput in your mails.

You didn't copy the text by hand, did you? Oh well, quite a lot of work.
Post by F J Brooks
[avision] sane-init: config file line 14: trying to attach 'scsi Hp.
[avision] attach: (Version: 1.0 Build: 55)
[avision] attach: opening {dev{sg2
[avision] attach: sending INQUIRY
[avision] attach: Inquiry gives mfg=HP, model=Scanjet 5300C, product
revision=6.00.
[avision] FOUND'
For me that looks ok, but I'm not the maintainer of the avision backend.
Was the file "scanner-name.png" generated (in the current directory)?
If yes, can you display it (e.g. with gimp, display or any other
viewer program)? I'm sure there is an image viewer from KDE, but I
don't know its name.
Post by F J Brooks
Then I (left)-clicked my 'Scanner' icon and: EUREKA!! up came the XSane
introductory window, which - after the licence agreement - invited me to
choose between: 'Hewlett-Packard ScanJet 5300C flatbed scanner
[avision:/dev/scanner]' and 'Hewlett-Packard ScanJet 5300C flatbed scanner
[avision:/dev/sg2].
That's because you have a link "/dev/scanner" pointing to "/dev/sg2".
No problem, both are the same.
Post by F J Brooks
I chose the former and, after some fiddling, managed to
get an image in the Viewer window. I couldn't, however, get it to print, but
as I haven't yet had time to set it up, I suppose that's not surprising.
So the scanner works. I think it also worked with scanimage above, you
may just not have noticed that the image was saved to the disk without
any printing to the command line.

Bye,
Henning
F J Brooks
2003-05-24 18:04:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rene Rebe
Can you run these commands (in the same terminal on your desktop) and
mail me the output? Please power-cycle the scanner so that it is in a
clean state!
export SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=7
scanimage -L
scanimage -l 5mm -t 5mm -x 15mm -y 15mm > scanner-name.png
Did the log extracts I sent you help, Rene?

Since then, I've not got much farther with XSane because I get a multiple
image in the Viewer - eight reduced-size images spread across the Viewer
window. Any thoughts?

Because of this, I've installed QuiteInsane to see if it is any better. It
works! - although the quality isn't brilliant, but I haven't 'fine-tuned' it
yet. The only problem is that it's painfully s-l-o-w - particularly the
p--r--i--n--t--i--n--g (it takes about ten minutes to print a single A4
colour page (in addition to the 4-5 minutes it takes to scan the image)!

Grateful for any thoughts on Sane.

Thanks

Best

Fred

Henning Meier-Geinitz
2003-05-14 21:29:49 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

Hey, I just want to help and know what should be fixed in SANE. No
oofense intended :-) Keep in mind that I (and quite a lot of others on
this list) are not native English speakers so the meaning of my words
may be a bit different from what I write.
Post by F J Brooks
I must ask you to forgive me if I point out that taking me to task for
getting where I am, and grilling me as to WHY I'm here, is all very well,
but the plain fact is that I am where I am - and I'm asking for help in
arriving at a solution. Before I start, it might be useful if I explain my
position: I am a simple, humble computer USER. I am not a geek or a techie,
and I have no wish to become a programmer.
Ok, no problem with that. So you buy a computer together with the
operating system and all the software. If you really want to change
something you can ask someone who get payed for installing software.
You wouldn't "upgrade" your car's brakes or even the motor without
exactly knowing what you do?

You are expecting too much. You can't compile your own software
without basic knowledge. That's just not possible.
Post by F J Brooks
I use my PC as a TOOL - not as an occupation, a way of life, or a
source of entertainment. I have been a W*****s user for something
over five years and am fed-up with its unreliability, vagaries and
unpredictability - hence my interest in Linux.
Linux is not a simple replacement of Windows. I've seen quite some
people changing operating systems and they cam back to Windows becasu
they expected Linux to be like Windows.
Post by F J Brooks
I must say that my experiences over the past two months or so have not
filled me with confidence, as I've found that SuSE Linux (I don't know
about other distributions) is about as USER-unfriendly as one
could get. After installing, I spent three weeks trying (in the end
successfully) to get onto the net and send email. After that debilitating
experience, I remarked to someone that I felt like I'd bought a new BMW and
Hey! The car comparison was mine :-)
Post by F J Brooks
then had to strip down the engine and remove and replace a piston before I
could drive it for the first time. Now, after about two weeks of struggling
to get my scanner to work, to carry this analogy further, I feel
like I've also had to replace the back-axle (because it was the wrong type),
dismantle the gearbox and re-grind two of the gear-wheels to get them to
mesh properly, and replace the chip in the engine management system!
The question is: Why are you doing this? Probable answer: The driver
that comes with your SuSE version is too old. Well, get a new one.
Don't try to change the whole system, just get a new driver
(sane-backends in this case).
Post by F J Brooks
Where did you get the impression that glib/gtk must be removed? That
documentation should be fixed.
When I started this scanner venture - which was something I had never
tackled before and had no knowledge of whatsoever - I gathered together as
That's not a wrong approach in general. What I do if I want to install
something I don't know is to read the documentation that comes with
that something first. If that doesn't work, I try to find more (or ask
someone who should know). At least the basic steps should be explained
in every package.
Post by F J Brooks
'Scanning with Linux' by Richard Drummond (Linux Format, December 2002).
'Scanning with SANE and Other Tools' by Michael J Hammel (Linux Journal,
April 2003).
'YoLinux Tutorial: Scanners and Linux' by Greg Ippolito
(http://yolinux.com).
'SANE: Linux scanner how-to. For beginners' by Steve Sheriff, 21 April 2001
I don't know those.
Post by F J Brooks
(http://www.xs4all.nl/~ljm/SANE/howto.html)
Oh well, I know that one. I don't say it's wrong but I think I've
criticised it before because of the gtk/glib stuff. It's written for
people with either very old systems or someone who really likes to
remove these libraries from the system I don't recommend that
instructions for beginners.

None of these texts are from the SANE project. They may help in
specific situations but generally the instructions in our package
should be enough.
Post by F J Brooks
The problem with most of this material (like, in my experience, MOST
computer articles, guides, HOWTOs and so-called 'Help' files), is that they
are written by geeks for geeks,
Geeks don't need guides. Well, most of the time :-)
Post by F J Brooks
and assume that you know how to do things before you start. This
leaves a humble, novice, never-been-there-before USER, not only cold,
but out in the cold.
The never-been-there-before user should not compile software if he
doesn't want to learn how to do that. It's like cars and brakes or the
motor...

I don't say you shouldn't mess with the motor but in this case you'll
need to read quite a lot before beeing able to mount it. And the motor
won't come with a manual explaining how to use a screw driver.
Post by F J Brooks
Quite often, I'm not able to get beyond the first paragraph before my
eyes glaze over and I throw the offending paper down in disgust with
an expletive or two, exclaiming (as our American friends say: 'Excuse
me!? Come again!?').
When that happens to me in University, I usually know that I've to
look up some basic stuff in a good book. E.g. my pressure sensor can
be used up to 150 °C. At higher tempeartures it has to be cooled (says
the manual). It doesn't explain how to coll, that's in one of these
nice big books. Did I mention that I'm a chemical engineer? :-)

Last time I have seen a SuSE package it came with three or four books.
Really massive books. Ther was even a chapter on the backgound of SANE
and I remeber that I couldn't find any error in that writing. I'm
pretty sure that there is also a chapter on how to compile your own
software.
Post by F J Brooks
In going through the documents I started with, I reluctantly came to the
conclusion that the only one which was suitable for my level of
understanding was the Sheriff (even tho it was somewhat dated), because he
obviously understood my predicament precisely, and wrote accordingly - with
every command clearly set out.
That's the problem. You must understand what you are doing. At least
basically. It's not nice to have a howto that is just a list of
commands to enter. If a little detail is different on your system you
can't procede. You may not even know that something is wrong.
Post by F J Brooks
The rest were, to a varying degree, uneven and inconsistent -
sometimes spelling out commands, sometimes not, sometimes leaving me
completely in the air with statements like, '...unpacking the tarball
and performing the usual configure/make incantation.' (Drummond).
Unpackung and building a source package should be explained in your
Operating system's manuals.
Post by F J Brooks
[Excuse me!? Come again!?], and: 'For most scanners you can make educated
guesses from the SANE web site supported-hardware list.' (Hammel). [Excuse
me!? Come again!? - I'm not educated!]; or telling me what I need to do but
not HOW TO DO IT, with vague, super-assumptive statements like: 'Once
configured (should be quite easy - or happen automatically on modern Linux
distributions' (Rebe) [Excuse me!? Come again!?]
He is right. If it doesn't work, read the docu.
Post by F J Brooks
I hesitate to ask this eminence: 'Have you ever tried to get an HP Scanjet
5300C working on SuSE 8.1?']
Not me, using Debian here :-)
Post by F J Brooks
So I went with Sheriff. He starts by telling me to remove glib, gtk+, sane
and xsane - 'in order to install new and up-to-the-minute libraries to make
SURE that all compiles.' This I do, using YaST2. Then he gets me to copy
($cp -a /usr/src/linux/include/scsi /usr/include).
This is not a good start
for me as I get the response: 'No such file or directory.'
That was good luck. His advice is dangerous at least. If you don't
know what that means, don't do it. You are just manipulating the
brakes of your car.
Post by F J Brooks
However, I press
on and, as instructed, create a new directory (/home/<username>/scanner),
into which I download and install glib-2.2.1.tar.gz, gtk+-2.2.1.tar.gz,
sane-backends-1.0.11, and xsane-0.90, as described in my original message.
I don't even know if gtk-2.2 works with xscanimage. 2.0 should work, I
haven't tested 2.2 yet.
Post by F J Brooks
Next day, I added sane-frontend-1.0.11.
Before you download all that you should try to find out what that
software is (e.g. on the SANE homeapge). You may not even need
sane-frontends (if you want to use xsane instead).
Post by F J Brooks
I guess it would have been even easier to just use a SuSE binary RPM,
e.g. this inofficial one from
http://packman.links2linux.de/index.php4?action=211 (not tested by me).
I've no idea what a 'SuSE binary RPM' is!
RPM is the format that SuSE (and other distributions) use to provide
their packages. A binary RPM contains the software ready to install, a
source RPM has the source code that must be compiled first.

I hope that's also explained somewhere in the SuSE maunals.
Post by F J Brooks
That usually means that you are not in the directory of the package,
forgot to run configure or configure hasn't finished because of errors.
If this happened in sane-backends, sane-frontends, or xsane, please
tell us the exact error message and what you did before.
No, I didn't 'forget to run configure'! Unfortunately, I didn't keep my log
of my sane-backends 'transactions' (unlike me!). However, I can say, with
some certainty, that there could not have been
anything wrong, otherwise I would have remembered and done something about
it. I do recall that it told me that if I had any problems to read
'PROBLEMS' - which I did - and there was nothing alarming there.
If make comapils about "no targets selected" that means there is no
Makefile. The Makefile is generated by configure. So either configure
didn't finish or you have been in a wrong directory. I don't think
there are any other possibilities.
Post by F J Brooks
The situation with glib-2.2.1 and gtk+-2.2.1 was different, and I had
error messages on both at the end of the 'configure' routine. On
glib, it said: 'checking for pkg-config...no onfigure: error:***
pkg-config not found. See
http://www.freedesktop.org/software/pkgconfig
Ok, so it was glib that complained, not sane. Well, you don't need it
anyway.
Post by F J Brooks
So I went to that site, downloaded and installed pkgconfig-0.15.0. Then
'Perhaps you should add the directory containing glib-2.0.pc'. So I
configured, 'make' and 'make install' both glib and gtk+ again, and both
looked OK.
No idea about those details. I have never build glib myself. Well, at
least not on Linux :-)
Post by F J Brooks
Then I downloaded and configured xsane-0.90. At the end of configure, it
**************************************************************************
'ERROR: GTK-1.2.0 or newer is needed for compiling xsane
if you installed gtk as rpm make sure you also included gtk-devel'
**************************************************************************
I'm not sure why xsane complains. Either it hasn't found your library
for some reason or the library is too new. If you just had used that
one that came with your distribution, that would have worked (I guess).
Post by F J Brooks
It added: 'you may need to remove /dev/null before you can run configure
again.'
That's a real bug in the configure script.
Post by F J Brooks
As (a) I didn't understand this, and (b) it said 'may', I ignored this (my
subsequent configure of xsane showed this to be the correct decision).
The wording is not perfect, you are right. You can run configure as
many times as you like without removing "config.cache" (that's what
should be printed instead of /dev/null). I just may not work.
Post by F J Brooks
etc, and to download and install 'pkgconfig-0.15.0', and install
'gtk-devel' (latter using YaST2)
pkgconfig isn't needed by any SANE package as far as I know. If you
compile gtk from source code, you don't need to install "gtk-devel",
because the headers are included in the source package. In fact, when
you installed gtk-devel you also installed gtk (if you had removed it
at all). So compiling gtk didn't make much sense ...
That's why I installed pkgconfigure and glib-devel - because I was TOLD to!
There is a phrase in German that goes like this "And if someone tells
you to jump from the top of the bridge into the water you do it?".

You can't trust every description on the web. It may be wrong. Or
misleading at least.
Post by F J Brooks
I've downloaded/read reams and reams of paper with titles like
'INSTALL',
For installing sane-backends, INSTALL should be enough.
You say that, but you weren't there to tell me that the information on the
sane-backends, which told me to read README, INSTALL and PROBLEMS, was
WRONG!. I also read the 'Beginners Information' and all the other
documentation I listed in my original message.
I'm on this list and on the #sane IRC channel for answering questions
most of the time :-)
Post by F J Brooks
The documentation is in the man pages. If something is missing, it
should be added. Please tell us what didn't work and what's missing.
I do not know how to answer this. You must understand that, as a very naive,
non-expert, I can only rely on the information I am given, and do what I am
told to do. I do not recall being told to read 'man pages' - but I WAS told
to read README, INSTALL and PROBLEMS.
That's enough for installation. You can't read the man pages until the
installation succeeds. The README tells you after installing
sane-backends:
"For information on configuring and trouble-shooting the various SANE
components, please refer to the manual page sane(7)."
Post by F J Brooks
The problem is: You just can't make a "good, simple, clear
documentation that supposes no previous knowledge". That would be a
big book if it should tell details for every supported scanner.
Then that's a major shortcoming of Linux!
That has nothing to do with Linux at all. It has to do with complex
problems and a huge variety of different scanners.
Post by F J Brooks
A short, simple instruction is: Install sane-backends, run scanimage
-L. If it doesn't work, read man sane, man sane-backendname.
But I did install sane-backends and ran scanimage -L and
sane-find-scanner - with the results detailed below - which, you say: 'Looks
fine', So I had no reason to think that there is anything wrong with
sane-backends - if there is(?).
Well ok, the docu should go on with: try scanning with "scanimage
Post by F J Brooks
image.pnm". If it doesn't work, do this and that...
But that means that you must know what a shell is, how to start
programs from the shell, how to read man pages. So it doesn't work
without previous knowledge.
I do not understand this point at all.
What I mean is that every single documentation in the world need
previous knowledge.
Post by F J Brooks
Did you try to actually scan with scanimage? What happened?
No, not being 'command-line-literate', being naturally lazy, and having been
brought up (if that's the right expression) on W*****s, I prefer to click an
icon.
If it works, it's ok that way. But you don't have much ways to debug
problems that way.
Post by F J Brooks
On my SuSE desktop - both 'root' and 'user' versions, which are slightly
different - there are a number of icons, such as Trash, /Windows/C,
/Windows/D,
OpenOffice, CD-R, CD-ROM, etc, etc, including one marked: 'Scanner'.
This is the icon I clicked.
Yeah, I know. That is some icon that was placed there by KDE or SuSE.
What I mean is that it may not work if you install an application
manually.
Post by F J Brooks
When you removed sane-backends from your distribution, you most probably
also removed xscanimage (or it was never installed).
The reason I downloaded/installed sane-frontend was that I understood that
it included xscanimage which, presumably, was removed when I removed
sane-frontend.
That's correct.
Post by F J Brooks
So, yesterday, I downloaded and installed 'sane-frontend-1.0.11'
(./configure, make, and make install).
Ok. I like xsane more, but your mileage may vary.
As I stated in my original message, I have also downloaded/installed xsane
as it seems to be generally recommended., but haven't yet tried to use it
(none of the articles I have cited tells me how!)
Well, you enter the name of the program into a shell like any other
program. jsut enter "xsane". But I don't think that will help in your
case. If xscanimage doesn't work, xsane probably won't work either.
Post by F J Brooks
'Error: Failed to set value at option gamma-table'.
Maybe the maintainer of the avision backend can answer this part.
The error message looks a bit strange, was this really the exact
wording? Anyway, it probably means that the frontend (xscanimage)
tried to set an option of the backend (avision) and failed. Maybe a
backend problem but I don't remember anyone mentioning it until now.
Sorry, Henning, the error message I quoted was not quite complete. It
'Error: Failed to set value at option gamma-table. Device busy.'
That is rather strange. But that's really stuff for the backend
maintainer. I'll change the subject so maybe he notices.
Post by F J Brooks
scanimage --version
Response: 'scanimage (sane-backends) 1.0.11; backend version 1.0.11'
Ok.
Post by F J Brooks
scanimage >image.pnm
Response: scanner whirred for a short time. Otherwise, no response on
screen.
Ok, so you jsut found out that it's not a problem of the frontend
(xscanimage and scanimage) but of the backend (avision).
Post by F J Brooks
SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=255 scanimage >image.pnm
Response: None at all.
Maybe the scanner is still confused from your first test? Enabling
debugging doesn't cahange behaviour, it should only print more messages.

Bye,
Henning
Martin Collins
2003-05-15 02:47:35 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 14 May 2003 20:58:16 +0100
"F J Brooks" <***@redgrave.screaming.net> wrote:

Hi Fred

I can't speak to your specific problem but maybe I can clarify a
couple of general points for you.
Post by F J Brooks
I've no idea what a 'SuSE binary RPM' is!
You have been downloading source code and compiling it. A compiled
executable program is often referred to as a binary. Modern Linux
distributions supply programs ready made in binary packages so you
don't have to compile them yourself. SuSE uses the RPM package format.
Your SuSE manual should tell you how to install RPM packages.
Post by F J Brooks
It added: 'you may need to remove /dev/null before you can run
configure again.'
This is bad advice, you did well to ignore it. The files in the /dev
directory are how Linux accesses hardware devices (or pseudo-hardware
devices) and you should not mess with them directly unless you know
what you are doing.
Post by F J Brooks
[Henning]
But that means that you must know what a shell is, how to start
programs from the shell, how to read man pages. So it doesn't work
without previous knowledge.
I do not understand this point at all.
"shell" is another word for command line. The online manual for Linux
programs can be accessed by typing "man programname" on the command
line. There is probably a GUI program called "Help Browser" or similar
you can use instead. Other documentation can be viewed in your web
browser at file://usr/share/doc or file://usr/doc
Post by F J Brooks
On my SuSE desktop - both 'root' and 'user' versions, which are
slightly different - there are a number of icons, such as Trash,
OpenOffice, CD-R, CD-ROM, etc, etc, including one marked: 'Scanner'.
This is the icon I clicked.
Such icons are provided by SuSE and are set up automatically when you
install an RPM package. Installing from source may put the programs
in a different place than SuSE expects and will not set up any icons,
so existing icons may no longer work.
Post by F J Brooks
As I stated in my original message, I have also downloaded/installed
xsane as it seems to be generally recommended., but haven't yet
tried to use it(none of the articles I have cited tells me how!)
Type "xsane" on the command line. This is generally true for all
programs and is therefore often taken for granted. Xsane is a nice GUI
program very similar to scanner programs on Windows.
Post by F J Brooks
[Henning]
scanimage >image.pnm
Response: scanner whirred for a short time. Otherwise, no response
on screen.
It is common for Linux programs to show no output when they succeed.
Only if there is a problem do they tell you about it. This command
should have created a file called image.pnm in the current directory.
If the scan didn't succeed the file may have zero size.
Post by F J Brooks
[Henning]
SANE_DEBUG_AVISION=255 scanimage >image.pnm
Response: None at all.
This should give you reams of output in your terminal window even if
it doesn't work properly.
Post by F J Brooks
You'll forgive my cynicism if, after all these 'adventures', I
give a hollow laugh when I note that 'SANE' is an acronym for
'Scanner Access Made Easy' [!!!]
Before SANE you would have had to write your own driver by reverse
engineering the Windows driver without help or documentation from the
scanner manufacturer. Not easy :-)

You have made life hard for yourself by bypassing all the "user-friendly"
layers that SuSE and others have added on top of Linux. Sometimes this is
necessary if you need a newer version of a program than the one your
distribution provides a package for. In such cases you should first look
for a suitable package made by someone else, starting at the program's
web site then at www.rpmfind.net. Compiling is a last resort.
Beware installation instructions that are old or not specific to your
distribution. Learn how to use SuSE's installation mechanisms.
Considering your level of knowledge and the red herrings you've been
following I'm impressed that you've got as far as you have, but you
really need to read that SuSE manual.
And I'm confident that the guys here will be able to sort you out
eventually.

Martin
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